Raise Your Vision

October 28, 2014

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Board Responsibilities vs. Staff Responsibilities By Mike Stickler

 

Responsibilities - Board versus StaffMany boards get tripped up when it comes to delineating their role in relation to the role of paid staff. A board member might not like the way a certain junior staff person (not the Executive Director) is performing his or her job. Should the board member address the issue with that staff person? Or the office copier breaks down, and the organization needs a new one. The funds aren’t in the budget. Can the Executive Director go ahead and purchase the copier without board approval?

These can be tricky situations.

In the first scenario, the organization’s Executive Director is responsible for managing the junior staff on a day-to-day basis. The board does not supervise the staff with the exception of the Executive Director, so this situation should be left up to the Executive Director. In the second scenario, the board sets the annual budget and must approve any changes to it. That means that the Executive Director can’t buy the new copier until the board adds the funds to the budget.

Separating board and staff responsibilities is easier if you think about each group’s focus. Broadly speaking, the board is responsible for overall planning and policy development, as well as approving and evaluating policies. The staff implements the policies and plans, broadly speaking.

Although I suggest a strict delineation of board/staff duties, it’s not unusual for staff members to be included in board activities. For example, the chief executive often collaborates with the board chairman on development of the board meeting agendas. Staff members may attend board meetings to give reports; for example, the Development Director may provide a progress report on a major grant application, and the Finance Director may provide financial reports. But it’s important to note that staff members do not have a vote and do not offer opinions or engage in discussion unless asked by a board member. Finally, staff members may be members of board committees. For example, the Development Directors would be a logical addition to the Finance or Fundraising Committee.

Your staff and your board will benefit—and therefore, your organization will benefit—from being as clear as possible about roles and responsibilities.

You can hear more about effective board leadership from Michael Williams at The Vision Group’s Raise Your Vision Online Forum. Mike Stickler is managing partner of The Vision Group, Ltd.

Would your Like to learn more: Join Mike for this free webinar
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Use, unless expressly given by the Company in writing, is unlawful by U.S. Copyright Law.

October 21, 2014

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Your First Meeting with a Philanthropist: What He Wants to Know By Mike Stickler

Blog-Peter-Strople1When a leading philanthropist meets with an organization seeking his support, what does he most want to know about them? Peter Strople has been called “One of the World’s Great Rainmakers,” “The Most Connected Man in America,” and “One of the Most Connected People in the World.” He is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer at Zero2 Ventures, and he advises investors and executives involved in start-ups to Fortune 25 global companies.

He’s also my good friend.

 

I asked Peter to share the top things he would want to learn in the first 30 minutes of meeting with an organization that is seeking his support.

Peter said,

  • It’s not financial.
  • I want to look at the executive team. If they are all saying different things in regards to why this organization exists and what its future initiatives are, that’s a problem.
  • I want to meet the people behind the organization.
  • I want to know why they’re doing what they’re doing.
  • I’d love to know people’s backgrounds. Were they called to this, or is it a job they’re doing just to try support their families?
  • I want to see if they understand who their competition is. Even in a church environment, I want to know who they see as the people that they have to worry about in that community.
  • I want to know how much they have been given
  • I want to know how their resources are being managed toward fulfilling their vision.

You can hear more about Effective Ministry Leadership from Peter Strople. Peter is also one of the presenters for The Raise Your Vision Online Forum.

 

Would you like to learn more about Philanthropy?  Join Mike for this free Webinar - Click the image to find out More
All information and images property of The Vision Group, Ltd. © 2014 Use, unless expressly given by the Company in writing, is unlawful by U.S. Copyright Law.

October 17, 2014

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Freebie Friday: Podcast with Philanthropist Arch Bonemma

Get your free Podcast about mentoring up and coming Christian Philanthropists and Marketplace Leaders.
Arch Bonemma is well know Christian Philanthropist. 

(Click on the Image for the Free Download)

October 14, 2014

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Make Fundraising a Party with a Purpose By Mike Stickler

park event MikeStickler.comVision-based fundraising invites involvement

The vision-based approach invites people to come on board and participate in fulfilling the purpose for which the organization was formed in the first place. It engages them and encourages deeper and deeper relationships with the organization. So the idea is to move from need to vision, because then people come into partnership with us rather than merely being cash cows. Nobody likes to be a cash cow. But people love to be part of something that’s meaningful.

One thing that’s really surprising to me is how few ministries and organizations and churches have a compelling, clearly defined vision that ignites them and their community and guides their efforts. But without doing the work of clarifying your vision and making it clear to people, it becomes very difficult to engage them in what you’re doing.

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October 14, 2014

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Can You Get Where You’re Going? By Mike Stickler

One of the  keys to effective capacity building  is taking stock of where you are , at whatever point you are in the life of your organization. It’s especially critical at the very beginning when you are initially growing your vision, casting your vision, and trying to get yourself into operation to  do a thorough assessment of what it’s going to take.
Blog-capacity-building-mike-stickler

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October 07, 2014

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Hear It, See It, Catch It, Own It, By Mike Stickler

Every visionary leader wants to engage members of his or her community and invite them to participate in fulfilling the ministry vision God has given.

When a leader is intentional about inviting people to participate in the ministry, there are four levels at which an individual may engage with that vision.

The “hear it” level
Vision resized
When you first invite people into your vision, they’re hearing about your vision for the very first time. Don’t ask them for money. Just realize that they’ve only just been introduced to the vision.  And maybe 10% of them really understood it that first time.
The “see it” level
Once someone has heard what you’re doing, you want to bring them to another level of understanding the vision by inviting them to see it. This is where they get to witness and experience what your ministry is trying to accomplish. When a camp director invites someone who’s “heard it” to visit the camp and see it camp in operation, that’s inviting them to the next level of engagement.
The “catch it” level

Once they begin to see it—to experience it up close—they begin to catch it. When they begin to catch the vision, they ask real questions. Thoughtful questions, not casual questions like “How many people go through your soup kitchen?”

Instead, they really want to know how effective you are. When they begin to catch it, it engages their imagination. It engages their prayer life. They discuss it with who are close to them. When they catch the vision, they really start to think it through.

The “own it” level

When they catch it, from there, as God would lead them, more and more they become “own-its” in your ministry. 

And that’s where you want them to be. That’s real engagement.

At the own-it level, they are asking themselves, “How can I help? How can I share what I have? How can I be a part of this?” Every time they see an opportunity or an event, they ask themselves how they can be involved.

You’ve heard the old statistic, that 20% of the people do 80% of the work. Wouldn’t it be fantastic if 80% of the people were doing all of the work—all of the funding, all of the volunteering?

Your ministry could be like that if you had them all engaged at the catch-it and own-it levels. And that's the amazing product of a visionary leader who is intentional about sharing the vision God has given them and inviting others to join them in it.

What level of engagement do you find the most challenging? The most exciting?

Mike Stickler is Managing Partner of The Vision Group, Ltd. Mike is also offers a free training that will help you grow your vision.

All information and images property of The Vision Group, Ltd. ©2014 Use, unless expressly given by the Company in writing, is unlawful by U.S. Copyright Law.

HeArt of Fundraising

September 30, 2014

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Could This Be Said about Your Church? by Mike Stickler


mechanic - marketplace ministry
As a former pastor, I shudder to think that someone might have been able to say this about my church. Actually, As a former pastor, I shudder to think that someone might have been able to say this about my church. Actually, it makes me shudder to think of it being said about any church. I am now a sales manager for a major steel company. In the almost thirty years of my professional career, my church has never once suggested that there be any type of accounting of my on-the-job ministry to others. Our church has never once offered to improve those skills which could make me a better lay minister. Nor has it ever asked if I needed any kind of support in what I was doing. There has never been any inquiry into the types of ethical decisions I must face, or whether I seek to communicate my faith to my co-workers. I have never been in a congregation where there was any type of affirmation of a ministry in my career. In short, I have to conclude that my church doesn’t have the least interest in whether or how I minister in my daily work.– William Diehl in Christianity and Real Life

Except for the church staff and those who work in the home, it’s likely that all of the adults in your church spend their working hours in the marketplace, not at a church or ministry job. And perhaps we should include teens and young adults, who are just entering the work force and figuring out what their life’s work will be.

So why do churches give them so little support? Why do so many churches fail to equip people to live for Christ in the place where they spend most of their waking hours?

When someone volunteers to serve in the youth ministry or Sunday school at church, leaders usually want to provide at least some basic training so that the worker can be effective for an hour or two a week. Yet that same person may spend 40-plus hours of every week working in the marketplace without ever being taught what the Bible says about their work.

Church leader, I want to challenge you to dig into God’s Word and find out what it says about living for God in one’s daily work. Then teach it to your people.

Imagine the impact it would have for the Kingdom if every marketplace worker in your church knew how to turn their daily work into an ambassadorship for Christ.

How does your church help your people to be faithful in their daily work?

You can hear more about leadership from Mike Stickler on this week's featured program. Mike is also one of the presenters at The Raise Your Vision Online Forum.
 

 

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